Entries by Will Adams

Removing Dried Glue from Antiques

If you’ve collected artifacts or antiques long enough, you’ve undoubtedly encountered a sticky situation: glue. The sticky stuff comes in the form of old stubborn labels stuck to glass, Elmer’s Glue used to mount arrowheads onto a display board, or a bad repair job involving antique wood. Whatever the situation may be, you’re not stuck […]

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Cleaning Cloudy Antique Glass

Cloudy glass, otherwise known as sick glass, can sometimes be cleared. Sick glass occurs when hard water seeps into the glass through micro fractures. The calcium, lime, and other minerals in the water cause a light, foggy appearance to occur. And as antique glass collectors know, eliminating “cloudy glass” can be a formidable challenge.   […]

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Clovis Points Explained

Clovis points are quite possibly the most coveted point of Native American artifact collectors. Clovis points are the unmistakably-fluted (a leaf like groove emanating from the central base) projectile points associated with the New World Clovis culture of the Early Paleoindian period―which lasted for nearly 1,000 years, from 11,500 to 10,500 years ago. This period […]

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13 Things You Can Do To Protect and Preserve Autographs, Photographs, and Paper Documents

Everyday I’m reminded of my failure to observe some of the most basic rules for protecting and preserving the items in my collection. Hanging in my office is a framed, autographed Peyton Manning photo, and a list of the records he set in his rookie season. At one time, his signature boldly sprawled from one edge of the photo to the other. Today, it’s barely visible.

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Dog License Tags

Owney, a scruffy Terrier mix, wandered into the annals of dog tag history when he trotted into the Albany, New York, post office in 1888. With a peculiar attraction to the scent of mailbags, Owney soon became a fixture at the post office.

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3 Ways to Remove Rust from Iron

Rust. One of the most formidable enemies of antique collectors the world over. Not only is rust visually unappealing, it’s a bona fide antique killer! Given enough time, oxygen, and water (moisture), an iron object will inevitably transform to rust and disintegrate. The longer rust is allowed to persist, the more it devours its host. […]