First Thanksgiving Plymouth

As Plymouth, Massachusetts, celebrates the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower’s arrival in 1620, ongoing archaeological work at the original Pilgrim settlement has unearthed a sweeping array of Native American and early European artifacts. These discoveries, together with primary source accounts written by Pilgrims William Bradford and Edward Winslow, have reshaped our understanding of the “First Thanksgiving”; a three-day feast celebrating the Pilgrims’ first harvest in the New World in 1621.       Read more

Stingy Jack

Portly pumpkins with twisted faces are a sure sign that the Halloween season is upon us. Often referred to as jack-o’-lanterns, these ghoulish-faced pumpkins have quite the backstory.

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Funky Smells

If you are a collector of old things, chances are you are also an accumulator of weird smells. As an antique collector, that peculiar funk just comes with the territory. While you might revel in the smell of “vintage”, those around you might not. In fact, it might be time for an odor intervention, especially if someone has told you “I cannot put my finger on it, but there is something about you that just plain stinks.” As painful as those words can be, do not let your hearts be troubled. We some natural remedies to get that funk out of your life! Read more

Joaquin Murrieta

As we navigate the present circumstances brought about by the pandemic, there has been a lot of talk about masks, who wears them, who refuses to, why, and why not. Having been on my mind lately, my thoughts about masks drifted in a different direction, towards Don Diego Vega, better known by his alter-ego, Zorro. Read more

Museum Labels DIY

If you are looking for creative ways to convert your living space into a museum quality display exhibit, this article might just do the trick. We will show you how (and with what) to accentuate your collection with museum labels, also referred to as captions or tombstones.

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California Raisins

With a $7.5 million dollar ad campaign teetering dangerously close to being lost, Seth Werner, a 31-year-old copywriter at the ad agency Foote, Cone & Belding, knew it was show time. Moments after walking into the pitch meeting, Werner pressed play on his cassette player. After a brief period of awkward idleness, Werner began to shimmy his way across the meeting room floor as the Motown hit “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” bellowed from Werner’s boom box.

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Dead Man's Hole

Adolph Hoppe desperately pushed his horse to race faster through the dry and unforgiving underbrush of the Texas Hill Country. With his eyes set on the horizon, towards home, he could feel the bloodthirsty bushwhackers closing in on him. 

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Collectible Insurance

If your collectibles were lost, damaged, or stolen, would your homeowners or renters insurance policy pay to repair or replace those collectibles? When asked this question, it’s not uncommon for a collector to respond “Well of course, that’s why I have insurance.” Unfortunately, that’s not always the case.

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Removal Confederate Ghosts Virginia

Richmond, April 1 – Localities in Virginia are closer to having the power to remove Confederate ghosts from public spaces throughout the state.  

Acknowledging that change was long overdue, Democrats, who took control of the House and Senate in November 2019, passed two bills on near party-line votes on Tuesday. The bills largely allow cities to “remove, relocate, contextualize, vacate, cover, alter, bury, or trap” Confederate ghosts meandering about public spaces.

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Bloodletting

Following a ride in blistering cold weather, George Washington awoke at 2 a.m. on December 14, 1799, with a fever, sore throat, and respiratory difficulties. A believer in the healing powers of bloodletting, Washington asked to be bled. After a series of medical procedures, including blisterings, emetics, laxatives, and the draining of nearly 40 percent of his blood, Washington died that evening, of what has been diagnosed retrospectively as epiglottitis and shock.

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