Bloodletting

Following a ride in blistering cold weather, George Washington awoke at 2 a.m. on December 14, 1799, with a fever, sore throat, and respiratory difficulties. A believer in the healing powers of bloodletting, Washington asked to be bled. After a series of medical procedures, including blisterings, emetics, laxatives, and the draining of nearly 40 percent of his blood, Washington died that evening, of what has been diagnosed retrospectively as epiglottitis and shock.

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Removing Dried Glue Antiques

If you’ve collected artifacts or antiques long enough, you’ve undoubtedly encountered a sticky situation: glue. The sticky stuff comes in the form of old stubborn labels stuck to glass, Elmer’s Glue used to mount arrowheads onto a display board, or a bad repair job involving antique wood. Whatever the situation may be, you’re not stuck without choices.

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Foxing

Named after the reddish-brown color of its blemishes, foxing is a form of deterioration that marks paper documents and photographs with rust colored splotches, spots, and specks. While foxing can negatively impact the value of collectible paper documents, it doesn’t directly affect the integrity of the paper.

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Ammonites

Most notably collected for their remarkable ornamental form, ammonites, the predatory mollusks that resembled squid, have long captured our fascination.

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2019 RelicRecord Articles

From firearms, DIY hacks, and dog license tags to majestic man manes of the American Civil War and Bob Ross (yes, that Bob Ross), we’ve covered some interesting subjects in 2019. Here are 9 of our favorite infographics, articles, and images of 2019.

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Cleaning-Cloudy-Antique-Glass

Cloudy glass, otherwise known as sick glass, can sometimes be cleared. Sick glass occurs when hard water seeps into the glass through micro fractures. The calcium, lime, and other minerals in the water cause a light, foggy appearance to occur. And as antique glass collectors know, eliminating “cloudy glass” can be a formidable challenge.  

Over the years, the aforementioned collectors have devised a number of remedies to treat―and sometimes cure―sick glass. Using only household items, here are 5 methods for cleaning cloudy antique glass.  

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Clovis Points Explained

Clovis points are quite possibly the most coveted point of Native American artifact collectors. Clovis points are the unmistakably-fluted (a leaf like groove emanating from the central base) projectile points associated with the New World Clovis culture of the Early Paleoindian period―which lasted for nearly 1,000 years, from 11,500 to 10,500 years ago. This period is marked by the first human entry into the New World, presumably from Asia via the Bering Land Bridge, and the end of the last Ice Age, 13,500 to 12,800 years ago.

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Bob Ross Happy Little Trees

Just off U.S. Route 50 in Herndon, Virginia, stands a non-descript warehouse that houses more than a thousand paintings created by one of America’s most recognized and beloved painters: Bob Ross.

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Preserve Autograph

Everyday I’m reminded of my failure to observe some of the most basic rules for protecting and preserving the items in my collection. Hanging in my office is a framed, autographed Peyton Manning photo, and a list of the records he set in his rookie season. At one time, his signature boldly sprawled from one edge of the photo to the other. Today, it’s barely visible.

Collectible Insurance


If your collectibles were lost, damaged, or stolen, would your homeowners or renters insurance policy pay to repair or replace those collectibles? When asked this question, it’s not uncommon for a collector to respond “Well of course, that’s why I have insurance.” Unfortunately, that’s not always the case. Read more