Fossilization

Dug up, buried, mined, quarried. Yes. Sign me up.

Rooted in Latin, the word ‘fossil’ stems from ‘fossus’, meaning, “having been dug, buried, mined, or quarried.” Fossils are rocks; more specifically, the petrified remains of ancient organisms. Fossilization is the process by which those remains become fossils. Read more

Schnurrbart Kitzler Civil War Hair Stylist

With the American Civil War being just the second large-scale war to occur during the age of photography (the Crimean War being the first), people of the day saw the indelible images of battle for the first time – casualties, carnage, privation, hardship, heroics, and, yes, absolutely stunning facial hair. Read more

Projectile Point Identification

Collecting Native American projectile points, or arrowheads as they are commonly called, has been a popular pastime for generations of history enthusiasts. In prehistoric North America, projectile points were designed to be fastened to the ends of spears, darts, and arrow shafts. While points were made from antler, bone, and copper, most—at least most that have been preserved—were made from stone. Read more

Fort Zachary Taylor

Thanks to its swashbuckling history, conch-style architecture, historical landmarks, Caribbean vibes, tangy Key Lime Pie, picturesque sunsets, and eclectic culture, Florida’s Key West has long been an alluring destination for the inquisitive traveler. Read more

The Church War Cross

I am young, I am twenty years old; yet I know nothing of life but despair, death, fear, and fatuous superficiality cast over an abyss of sorrow. I see how peoples are set against one another, and in silence, unknowingly, foolishly, obediently, innocently slay one another.Read more

South Carolina Dispensary

While Tennessee toasts Jack Daniel’s Whiskey, and Kentucky cheers Jim Beam’s Bourbon, neighboring South Carolina runs dry on notable liquor royalty. As America’s whiskey and bourbon men were mashing their way to fame and fortune at the turn of the 20th century, a conniving, one-eyed politician was cooking up his own elixir: a state-run monopoly on all alcohol bottled and sold within the borders of the Palmetto State, South Carolina. Read more

John Wilkes Booth's Philadelphia Deringer

The stage actor powerfully clutched the pocket-sized single-barrel pistol in his right hand. Outfitted with black walnut grips and German Silver hardware, it anxiously awaited its handler’s evil instruction. In the actor’s left hand, a stag-handled dagger readied itself to be violently thrust into action. Read more

Allen Jacobs Iowa Infantry

Proudly standing before a full-length mirror, he tugged on the ends of his jacket, adjusted his sweat stained collar, and repositioned his blue kepi. Taking a seat as instructed, he straightened his back and stared intently into the photographer’s peculiar contraption, careful not to move. In the still and silent moments that followed, he solemnly reflected on his life. Read more

Interwoven with the terrible carnage and historical significance of the Battle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863), is the enduring legend that the Civil War’s most prolific battle was fought over shoes. On September 13, 1863, a little more than 10 weeks after the battle, Confederate General Henry Heth, whose Virginians were the first to engage the Union Army on July 1, filed his official report in which he explained why he ordered a detachment of his division into Gettysburg. Read more

WW2 Ration Tokens

When milling about an antique store one lazy afternoon, I came across an assortment of red and blue discs, haphazardly displayed inside a locked curio case. About the size and thickness of a penny, made from fibrous material, and designed to look like currency, I soon learned these tokens—and millions more like them—once served a vitally important role in America’s wartime economy during World War II. Read more