Over the Labor Day holiday, I spent quite a few hours working on a process for our customers to upload a spreadsheet of their items into to their RelicRecord account. This import process will allow those customers who are already tracking items in spreadsheet programs like Microsoft Excel, or local databases like Microsoft Access, to upload a list of basic information in a few short steps rather than have to manually create each item in the system. Read more

Over the past few weeks, we’ve been narrowing our focus on how best to create, view and make edits to an item in your collection. We also understand that this process needs to be as quick and easy as possible for the collector. To that end, users will have a few different options when adding a new item to their collection.

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Where are we going to put all this stuff?

With potentially hundreds of thousands of pictures and rows upon rows of data, this is an important question for any new website project. With technology, there is always more than one way to do something. The same holds true for how RelicRecord.com is being built.

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Since this is the first post on the progress of the web application, it only makes sense for us to start with an update on customer registration and user preferences.

For someone who is interested in using the application, they will have to create a free account. We want to make this as painless as possible, while still keeping the security of our customer’s data in mind. The past few weeks we have focused on the sign up process which included the creation of registration forms and easy to follow instructions for things like password complexity.

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What do you collect?

For me, I’ve collected baseball cards (an obvious entry into collecting for a kid), stamps, coins, arrowheads, collectible card games, fountain pens and even buckeye nuts. My collections have never really amounted to much in size or value but I had fun getting them together and inventorying them. My brother is big into “hunting treasure” which is mostly buried civil war and world war two relics forgotten by time. Somewhere in there I’m pretty sure he has a small collection of fossils and arrowheads as well. The folks also have their own collections they have gathered over the years. The running joke in our family is that mom has collected pretty much every antique juicer in Tennessee and probably parts of Alabama. Being a southern family, there are also pocket knives, arrowheads and other relics of a southern heritage. Read more