Posts

Friendships Gained & Memories Made

Friendships Larry Hicklen

I’m an unabashed, American History enthusiast, and an obsessed collector of Civil War artifacts. To feed my insatiable appetite for history and Civil War relics, I regularly click thru the seemingly endless items offered for sale on online relic shops, visit the few that still operate brick-and-mortar stores, and attend Civil War artifact shows across the country.   Read more

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The Civil War In Vivid Color

Civil War In Color

The Civil War has long been viewed through a black-and-white lens. Photographs taken by the early pioneers of photography; Matthew Brady and Alexander Gardner, have greatly impacted our perception of the war. Soldiers, towns, battlefields and political figures are remembered as ghostly figures, draped in drab shades of grey. I’ve often wondered if the nostalgia we have for this period in history would be any different if those historical moments were captured in color.  

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The Battle of Dead Angle: 153 Years Later

Sam Watkins Dead Angle

“The First and Twenty-seventh Tennessee Regiments will ever remember the battle of “Dead Angle,” which was fought June 27th, on the Kennesaw line, near Marietta, Georgia. It was one of the hottest and longest days of the year, and one of the most desperate and determinedly resisted battles fought during the whole war. Our regiment was stationed on an angel, a little spur of the mountain, or rather promontory of a range of hills, extending far out beyond the main line of battle, and was subject to the enfilading fire of forty pieces of artillery of the Federal batteries. It seemed fun for the guns of the whole Yankee army to play upon this point.” – Sam Watkins, First Tennessee Regiment, “Co. Aytch”

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Virginia Wine & Civil War Artifacts

Virginia Wine and Civil War Relics

For those of you that follow our blog, it should come as no surprise to you that I’m an unabashed nerd when it comes to Civil War history and artifacts. As such, I would like to dedicate this article to a delightful “nerd moment” that I recently experienced at The Winery at Bull Run. Read more

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Decoration Day & The Origins Of Memorial Day

Decoration-Day-Memorial-Day

Approximately 2% of the population, an estimated 620,000 men, lost their lives during the Civil War due to combat, accidents, starvation, and disease. Such carnage led to the creation of the country’s first national cemeteries, beginning in 1862. In the years following the end of hostilities, people in the North and South had begun holding tributes to honor the dead, decorating their graves with flowers and flags.

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11 Of Our Favorite Blog Posts Of 2016

11 Favorite Blog Posts 2016

2016 has been a fun and productive year for us here at RelicRecord.com. We’ve added numerous users to our collectible archiving platform, made great improvements to the software, introduced RelicShare; a fun place to create and share collectibles on social media, and developed a lot of new friendships along the way. While we weren’t wrenching on the software or speaking with users, we were writing blog posts, articles, and producing videos covering a wide variety of fun and interesting topics. In celebration of 2016, we’ve hand-picked 11 of our favorites, and present them here for you to enjoy. Read more

9 Websites Every Civil War Relic Collector Must Bookmark

Civil War Relic

As an avid Civil War relic collector, I rely on numerous websites for research purposes and for acquiring new pieces for my collection. I would like to share a few of those with you; 9 of them to be exact. It’s my hope that you’ll discover (or rediscover) at least a few new sites to frequent after reading this post. Read more

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The Destructive Practice of Civil War Artillery Disposal

Civil War Artillery Shell

As Hurricane Matthew battered the coast of Charleston, South Carolina, it dredged-up a few reminders of a previous and more violent affair. While walking the shoreline on Folly Beach Island, a local resident discovered 16 Civil War artillery shells that washed ashore in the wake of Matthew. News outlets reporting the story used words like “uncovered, discovered, unearthed, and revealed” in their headlines. Sadly, such words only told half the story. Read more

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Harper’s Weekly, A Journal of Civilization

Harper's Weekly Blog

From the outset of the Civil War to the end of the century, no other publication did more to reflect and shape public opinion than Harper’s Weekly. Most notably, the journal carried the most extensive coverage of the Civil War and strongly influenced political discourse through its masterful illustrations, thought-provoking editorials, and scathing political cartoons. Read more

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Our Favorite Civil War Artifact Stories

Civil War Artifact Stories

We recently worked the 38th Annual Southeastern Civil War and Antique Gun Show in Marietta, GA. In addition to enjoying the rich history on display, we also got a chance to visit with some old friends. I was reminded of the time many of us spent together just a year before, trading stories of some of our favorite Civil War artifacts and recoveries. In case you missed it, here’s a small sampling…
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