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Clovis Points Explained

Clovis points are quite possibly the most coveted point of Native American artifact collectors. Clovis points are the unmistakably-fluted (a leaf like groove emanating from the central base) projectile points associated with the New World Clovis culture of the Early Paleoindian period―which lasted for nearly 1,000 years, from 11,500 to 10,500 years ago. This period is marked by the first human entry into the New World, presumably from Asia via the Bering Land Bridge, and the end of the last Ice Age, 13,500 to 12,800 years ago.

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Is it legal to collect, metal detect, or dig for artifacts?

Over the past few years, there’s been a rash of aggressive police raids and legal action taken against artifact collectors and hobbyists. This has been part of a national effort to enforce laws prohibiting private citizens from illegally obtaining and collecting cultural artifacts―predominantly Native American artifacts.   Read more

In 2017, if we weren’t writing code for RelicRecord.com, we were writing articles for our readers to enjoy. The topics we write about are largely dictated by the interests of our readers. Simply put, we do our best to give people what they want! So what exactly do our readers want? Well, according to our data, here are the 10 most read, shared, and talked about articles of 2017. Enjoy! Read more

What do you collect?

For me, I’ve collected baseball cards (an obvious entry into collecting for a kid), stamps, coins, arrowheads, collectible card games, fountain pens and even buckeye nuts. My collections have never really amounted to much in size or value but I had fun getting them together and inventorying them. My brother is big into “hunting treasure” which is mostly buried civil war and world war two relics forgotten by time. Somewhere in there I’m pretty sure he has a small collection of fossils and arrowheads as well. The folks also have their own collections they have gathered over the years. The running joke in our family is that mom has collected pretty much every antique juicer in Tennessee and probably parts of Alabama. Being a southern family, there are also pocket knives, arrowheads and other relics of a southern heritage. Read more