Shaving History Blog

Our fascination with body hair—and its removal— has been a part of the human condition since the dawn of time. The practice of removing hair from one’s body (i.e. shaving); and the tools to do it, have evolved with every culture on every continent. Such history provides collectors of shaving gear with a plethora of tools and accessories to amass. Read more

digging into uk us archaeological laws blog

While metal detecting farmland close to his home in Staffordshire, England, Terry Herbert, an unemployed metal detecting enthusiast, stumbled on the largest, most jaw-dropping discovery of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork ever found, anywhere in the world. Read more

Civil War Artillery Shell

As Hurricane Matthew battered the coast of Charleston, South Carolina, it dredged-up a few reminders of a previous and more violent affair. While walking the shoreline on Folly Beach Island, a local resident discovered 16 Civil War artillery shells that washed ashore in the wake of Matthew. News outlets reporting the story used words like “uncovered, discovered, unearthed, and revealed” in their headlines. Sadly, such words only told half the story. Read more

Baby Bottles

Having just welcomed my beautiful daughter into the world, I’m sitting in our hospital room amazed by all of the “baby tech” and how much more advanced it is from even 6 years ago when our first daughter was born. This got me thinking; how did mothers of long ago care for their newborns without all of this stuff? I was especially curious about feeding practices. My curiosity sparked an interesting odyssey into the evolution of breastfeeding, its substitutes, and baby bottles. Shall we begin? Read more

venomous presidential election of 1828

In August of 1828, the editor of the Cincinnati Gazette, Charles Hammond, wrote: “General Jackson’s mother was a COMMON PROSTITUTE, brought to this country by the British soldiers! She afterward married a MULATTO MAN, with whom she had several children, of which number General JACKSON IS ONE!!! Read more

allure vintage mugshots blog

Patiently waiting to be summoned for jury duty by the bailiff, my eyes slowly scan the walls of my local superior court, carefully examining the framed photographs of the county’s sheriffs and judges of yesteryear. I’m immediately intrigued by the older photos; many of them dating back to the 1850s, depicting bearded men with piercing eyes and stern facial expressions that clearly project a general disposition of “don’t mess with me.” Read more

Bannerman

If you’ve collected military items for any length of time, chances are that you’ve heard of the name “Bannerman.” Like many successful entrepreneurs of yesteryear, Francis Bannerman IV was an immigrant, brought to America as a child. Born in Dundee, Scotland in 1851, the 3-year old Bannerman settled in Brooklyn, New York with his Scottish father and Irish mother. Read more

Harper's Weekly Blog

From the outset of the Civil War to the end of the century, no other publication did more to reflect and shape public opinion than Harper’s Weekly. Most notably, the journal carried the most extensive coverage of the Civil War and strongly influenced political discourse through its masterful illustrations, thought-provoking editorials, and scathing political cartoons. Read more

Carte-de-visite-blog

During the American Civil War, Mathew B. Brady, Alexander Gardner, and other photographers enjoyed tremendous business success due in large part to the popularity of the carte de visite (abbreviated CDV). Cartes de visite provided soldiers, family and friends with an affordable way to share photographic portraits with one another. Cartes de visite provided a soldier with a picture of what he was fighting for; his family. And for those on the Homefront, cartes showcased images that helped explain the war. Read more