Cracker Barrel Antiques Blog

Growing up, I was raised on a steady diet of southern comfort food dished out by Cracker Barrel restaurants. To this day, I’m well acquainted with the Fancy Fixin’ menu and the wide array of antique décor that precariously hangs from every conceivable surface inside the Old Country Store. While the food is diabetically delicious, it’s the antiques that have always caught my attention and sparked my curiosity. I’ve often wondered why certain objects are selected for display, where they come from, and if they’re real. Read more

The rickety wooden floors pop and squeak under the weight of my footsteps. The dull hum and soft glow of display lights creates a warm and inviting ambiance. The air is filled with a bouquet of earthy notes, hints of acidity, a tang of linseed oil and vanilla, over an underlying mossy dankness. Those unmistakable smells are not that of a well-aged Merlot, but that of the Civil War relics shops that I frequented in my youth. Shops that might as well be listed as “endangered”, right alongside the Civil War battlefields whose history they so beautifully bring alive. Read more

During the American Civil War (1861-1865), soldiers on both sides of the conflict spent more time in camp; or marching, than they did fighting. While resting in camp, soldiers wrote letters to loved ones, read, smoked, played music, gambled, or whittled away their worries on just about any object they could get their hands on. And for most soldiers, their ammo pouch provided the perfect material. Read more

Virginia Wine and Civil War Relics

For those of you that follow our blog, it should come as no surprise to you that I’m an unabashed nerd when it comes to Civil War history and artifacts. As such, I would like to dedicate this article to a delightful “nerd moment” that I recently experienced at The Winery at Bull Run. Read more

In 2017, if we weren’t writing code for RelicRecord.com, we were writing articles for our readers to enjoy. The topics we write about are largely dictated by the interests of our readers. Simply put, we do our best to give people what they want! So what exactly do our readers want? Well, according to our data, here are the 10 most read, shared, and talked about articles of 2017. Enjoy! Read more

Collectible Cash Registers

Early cash register manufacturers had to sell their registers not just on functionality, but also on beautiful, ornate design. These early fixtures had to be the shiny, crown jewel of the shopkeeper’s establishment―a shrine to the money they held. Those are the same attributes that draw the interest of today’s collector.    Read more

Nazi Military Artifacts Blog

Military antiques, known by collectors as militaria, are closely associated with military and police artifacts, and collected for their historical significance. Within the militaria trade, there’s one category of memorabilia that evokes controversy and heated debate among collectors, dealers, governments, and the general public; Nazi artifacts. Inevitably, a familiar question is posed: Is it okay to buy, sell, trade, or collect Nazi related artifacts, especially those bearing the swastika? Read more

Georgia Folk Pottery Blog

Folk pottery is just as synonymous with the state of Georgia as peaches and pecans are―or at least it should be. Long known for its rich deposits of clay, Georgia inhabitants have long used it to create pottery. Native Americans that once lived along the Savannah River, made cooking and storage wares of the naturally abundant red clay. In fact, earthenware recovered from this region are some of the oldest ever discovered in North America (~2500 B.C.). Read more

Psychedelic Rock Posters

Among the most prolific psychedelic rock bands of the 1960’s and 70’s, the Grateful Dead’s intoxicating music moved its fans and inspired a new era of artists, and art – rock posters. Read more

Twitter Throughout History Blog

If you follow us on Facebook or Twitter, you may be aware of our peculiar interest in one simple, but very profound question: What if Twitter existed throughout human history? In a very poor attempt to answer that question, we present some of history’s greatest figures in 140 characters or less… Read more