In June of 1941, the famed General George S. Patton arrived in Murfreesboro, Tennessee along with 11,000 troops and 2,000 vehicles. In short order, as many as 77,000 troops had converged on Middle Tennessee and were soon divided into opposing Red and Blue Armies that would clash in simulated, but realistic, battles that would continue through 1944. When operations ended in ‘44, more than 800,000 troops had occupied more than 2.25 million acres and 22 counties in Middle Tennessee. Read more

General Hooker

Following the Union Army’s embarrassing defeat at the First Battle of Bull Run, Joseph Hooker was appointed brigadier general and ordered to defend Washington, D.C., from further Confederate incursions. Wasting no time, Hooker quickly established a large encampment just outside the city, where he first commanded a brigade, then a division, as part of the effort to organize and train the new Army of the Potomac, under Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan.

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10 Firearms Shaped America

In the United States, civilians own nearly 400 million firearms. That’s three times as many guns as the armed forces of Russia, China, North Korea, Ukraine, United States, India, Vietnam, Iran, South Korea, Pakistan, and all other countries… combined. In short, Americans love guns.

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The War Between the Beards

Perched high upon a hilltop just south of Cloyd’s Mountain in western Virginia, Confederate Brigadier General Albert G. Jenkins gazed down upon the advancing Union Army of West Virginia, under the command of Brigadier General George R. Crook.

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Albert Joyce Riker

In his intellectual lifetime, Joyce’s work brilliantly tackled a plethora of scientific disciplines, from his widely-read publications on the causes and prevention of tree diseases to being an early innovator of the cultivation and harvesting of poplars for wood pulp. He authored the highly esteemed, “Introduction to Plant Diseases,” and was the recipient of numerous awards and honors bestowed upon him for his immeasurable contributions to science.

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Wooden Duck Decoys

Some have argued that art imitates life, while others say that life imitates art. Native Americans would have agreed with both positions. When the colonists first came ashore in North America, they observed Native Americans using mud, cattails, and other organic materials to craft imitations of ducks and other fowl. These decoys would attract live water fowl, which hunters would then capture or kill.

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RelicRecord Affiliate Marketing Program

Like many small business owners, my brother and I started RelicRecord.com on a shoestring budget. Nearly five years later, we’re still swinging by that string! We’ve never viewed our business funding (or lack thereof) as a limitation, but rather as motivation to be creative, innovative, and resourceful. For the past five years we’ve relied on the feedback of collectors, dealers, and software users, to help guide and shape the development of our program. Everything we’ve been able to accomplish thus far can be attributed to good ole’ fashion hard work and word-of-mouth marketing. Read more

Thrift Store Whiff

Woody, herbal, nutty, smoky, musty, sweet, cheesy, sweaty, bready, fermented, sour, and creamy. Stale Doritos. Gym bag. Smelly feet. A peculiar, but familiar bouquet to us all. A smell better known as “Thrift Whiff.”

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Whoopee Cushion History

The dinner host politely motions you to “have a seat,” as they pull the chair away from the dinner table. As you gracefully make your way down and into the chair, it happens. The Command Fart―a pocket of air that has been chambered for an extended period of time, waiting for just the right moment to be released for maximum effect.

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Five Stages of Inebriation

Photography has long been used as a tool for journalists, artists, marketers, and organizations to convey messages of realism and truth. The Photographers Association of America once explained that people “believe what the camera tells them because they know that nothing tells the truth so well. Read more